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Kelly R. Monk, PhD

Kelly R. Monk, PhD recipient of 2016 Distinguished Investigator Award

Kelly R. Monk, PhD is a recipient of 2016 Distinguished Investigator Award. Article appearing at medicine.wustl.edu  Distinguished Investigator Award 2016...
Islet Mills Lab

Rare form of diabetes may require alternate treatment

Patients with a rare, genetic form of diabetes often are misdiagnosed as having type 2 diabetes because the two share symptoms. But new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that treating such patients with therapies designed for type 2 diabetes is...
Daniel S. Ory, MD

Patient advocacy key to finding new treatments for rare diseases

An article written by Daniel S. Ory, MD appearing at Congress Blog on thehill.com Patient advocacy key to finding new treatments for rare diseases ...

In obese patients, 5 percent weight loss has significant health benefits

For patients with obesity trying to lose weight, the greatest health benefits come from losing just 5 percent of their body weight, according to a new study at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Researchers found that the relatively small weight loss markedly lower...

Haroutounian named chief of clinical research for Pain Center

Simon Haroutounian, PhD, assistant professor of anesthesiology, has been named the chief of clinical research for the Washington University Pain Center at the university’s School of Medicine in St. Louis. The appointment was announced Feb. 4. Recognized as an international leader in t...
Jeffrey I. Gordon, MD

Targeting gut microbes may reverse effects of childhood malnutrition

The tens of trillions of microbes living in the gut are major players in human health. So-called friendly intestinal bacteria promote health, but disruptions in our resident microbes also have been linked to childhood malnutrition, an underlying cause of death for some 2.7 million chi...
Artery Plaque Mouse

Atherosclerosis is Alzheimer’s disease of blood vessels, study suggests

In atherosclerosis, plaque builds up on the inner walls of arteries that deliver blood to the body. Studying mice and tissue samples from the arteries of patients, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine​ in St. Louis suggest this accumulation is driven, at least in pa...
Emil Unanue, MD

Unanue receives Sanofi-Institut Pasteur Award

Emil R. Unanue, MD, an internationally renowned immunologist at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, has received a Sanofi-Institut Pasteur Award for his invaluable contributions to the field of immunology. The annual awards honor scientists who have made outstanding...
Diabetes Day Symposium 2016

Diabetes Research Center Diabetes Day 2015 – Poster Prize Winners Announced

The Diabetes Research Center is pleased to announce the Poster Prize winners of the Diabetes Day Poster Session held in the Farrell Learning and Teaching Center at Washington University on November 5, 2015. The Diabetes Research Center’s Annual Diabetes Day is designed to showcase out...
Deanna Barch, PhD and David Van Essen, PhD

The brain’s wiring is linked to good – and bad – behavioral traits

The way our brains are wired may reveal a lot about us, according to new research co-authored by scientists at Washington University in St. Louis. For example, people with “positive” behavioral traits, such as sharp memories, many years of education and robust physical endurance, have...