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Brian Finck, PhD

New strategy to lower blood sugar may help in diabetes treatment​

Some treatments for type 2 diabetes make the body more sensitive to insulin, the hormone that lowers blood sugar. But new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests a different strategy: slowing the production of glucose in the liver. Working in mice, t...
Sharon Cresci M.D. in her lab

Quitting smoking after heart attack gives quick boost to mental health, quality of life​​

A new study shows that quitting smoking after a heart attack has immediate benefits, including less chest pain, better quality of daily life and improved mental health. Many of these improvements became apparent as little as one month after quitting and are more pronounced after one y...
Fumihiko Urano, MD, PhD

Potential treatment target identified for rare form of diabetes

Cell death can trigger numerous diseases, including a rare and severe form of diabetes known as Wolfram syndrome. The cascade of cell death occurs when molecules spill from one part of a cell into another where they don’t belong. Now, scientists working to find treatments for Wolfram ...
Daniel Ory, MD

New clues in mice link cholesterol to fertility

Whether made by the body or ingested through diet, cholesterol plays a vital role in cells. Cholesterol also is a building block of steroids and hormones, including those that trigger puberty and support pregnancy. A new study implicates a surprising regulator of cholesterol in cells’...
Yarasheski laboratory team

Diabetes drug may reduce heart attack risk in HIV patients

In patients with HIV, a diabetes drug may have benefits beyond lowering blood sugar. A new study from researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests the drug may prevent cardiovascular problems because it works to reduce inflammation linked to heart dise...
Carlos Bernal-Mizrachi, MD

Vitamin D prevents diabetes and clogged arteries in mice

In recent years, a deficiency of vitamin D has been linked to Type 2 diabetes and heart disease, two illnesses that commonly occur together and are the most common cause of illness and death in Western countries. Both disorders are rooted in chronic inflammation, which leads to insuli...
Microglia

New target identified in fight against Alzheimer’s, multiple sclerosis

Highlighting a potential target in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) and Alzheimer’s disease, new research suggests that triggering a protein found on the surface of brain cells may help slow the progression of these and other neurological diseases. Working with mice, two resea...
severely malnourished child eating Chiponde (RUTF)

Gut microbes targeted for diagnosis, treatment of childhood undernutrition

Guided by the immune system, researchers have identified types of gut bacteria in young children in Malawi that are linked to nutritional health and that have diagnostic and therapeutic implications for childhood undernutrition. The research, led by Jeffrey I. Gordon, MD, at Washingto...
2014 2nd Century Awards

Cole, Hultgren, Loeb receive 2014 2nd Century Awards

Honored for their many and varied contributions to Washington University School of Medicine, the recipients of the 2014 2nd Century Awards were F. Sessions Cole, MD, Scott J. Hultgren, PhD, and Carol B. Loeb. The 2nd Century Awards recognize those whose long-term commitment and partic...
Shin-ichiro Imai, MD, PhD Lab

Shin-ichiro Imai | Molecular biologist seeks the keys to healthy aging

As Shin-ichiro Imai grew up outside Tokyo, he heard his parents many times tell the story of his unlikely birth. According to Imai, doctors told his mother there was a high risk of losing the pregnancy because of a partially detached placenta. Imai’s mother went to great lengths to fi...